News Archive 2015

BOWHUNTING FOR ELK ON PUBLIC LAND…
Rutting Bulls, Brilliant Aspens, Lifetime Memories

A Father & Son True Life Story – BY BOB SVETICH

As a bowhunter I’ve experienced the highest of highs and the lowest of lows. This roller coaster of emotions was never more evident than on my recent bowhunting trip for Elk on public land in Colorado. When bowhunting, much can go wrong and usually does. Anyone that has bowhunted knows this to be true. So why do so many hunters head to the woods and forests with bow in hand knowing that the odds of them being successful harvesting big game are very low? For some it’s the overall challenge of the hunt, for others it’s being up-close and personal with wild animals. And for others it’s a personal test of their own ability to outwit an animal that has many times the sensory capabilities that humans do. For me personally, bowhunting offers a kaleidoscope of experiences as told within this true story.

Bob Elk Photo 4

Bob Svetich
2015 Bow Elk Hunt

The 2015 Colorado bowhunting season for Elk was a year away as my son Jason and I discussed when and where we would schedule our annual hunting trip. After enjoying a delicious Elk burger for lunch, we decided on a location that we both are familiar with and blocked out a week in late September on our calendars. Once we received our applications several months later for this particular draw only area, we filled them out and submitted them with the hope of getting drawn. When we received our application notices a couple months later, we learned that my son Jason did not get drawn, but fortunately I did. The decision was made that my son Jason would accompany me as my guide. He is an excellent hunter and has called in Elk and harvested them with both bow and rifle, so I knew he would be an assist on this trip. Beside his abilities as a hunter, we’ve hunted together for many years and truly enjoy each other’s company.

I’ve been hunting for over 40 years many of which have been in the Rocky Mountains. The altitude and rugged terrain in this part of the country will test ones physical stamina. For this reason I cross train six days a week year-round in order to be physically ready. At my age it’s vitally important to be in the best shape you can be in to overcome the demands of high-altitude western mountain hunting. I also practice shooting my bow as often as I can and increase my practice sessions as the hunting trip date approaches.

As the months went by we crossed each one off the calendar until it was finally time to start packing for the trip. This year we would be camping in luxury, compliments of my son’s large 5th-wheel camper including all the amenities. Home away from home as I called it, and for a guy who has spent many nights camping in alpine tents and sleeping on a thin ground pad in my younger days, these accommodations are perfect for an aging man such as myself.

I spent the night at my son’s ranch in order to help with any last minute chores prior to leaving in the morning for our hunting trip. After a great night’s sleep and waking up to his bellowing cow herd and crowing rooster and cackling chickens, we had a hearty ranch breakfast and were off on the three hour drive to our hunting location. Arriving at our favorite campsite, we set up camp and laid out our hunting gear for the morning hunt. Talk that evening was all about strategizing and playing out scenarios that could happen. A few weeks earlier we had set up a couple treestands in strategic locations on game trails and tree rubbed areas. Using treestands to hunt Whitetails is a common hunting practice but you can also use treestands to hunt Elk with great success. Areas overlooking game trails, wallows, and rut areas are excellent locations to hang a stand.

The alarm rang at 3:30am and as I awoke from what seemed like only a couple hours sleep, excitement and anticipation began to take over my thoughts. My son Jason was already up making his morning coffee. After an energy filled breakfast and confirming our hunting strategy, we loaded up our gear on ATV’s for a thirty-five minute ride on a rough 4-wheel drive road to a grove of aspen trees where we would park and begin the long and difficult ascent to the top of the mountain. As we began walking up the mountain in the pitch dark we noticed a pair of eyes looking at us. We both thought it could be a mountain lion or bear as these critters inhabit the area. My son Jason brought out his high-beam flashlight and shined it on the pair of eyes that were staring straight at us. Our tensions eased when we identified the eyes belonging to a mule deer. Our ascent continued and after reaching the top of the mountain some 30 minutes later we headed toward our treestands. Jason took up his position 80 yards away in hopes to call game past me in order that I would get a broadside shot. Sitting in the dark in an elevated treestand some 15 to 20 feet off the ground, I was glad to be wearing my safety vest harnessed securely to the tree.

As the Eastern skies began to lighten my anticipation began to rise with hopes that a Bull Elk would come within shooting range of my stand. As the sun was coming up Jason began his calling sequence which was music to my ears and hopefully to the Elk’s as well. After a couple hours in our stands I spotted the legs of Elk walking through the forest trees 50 yards in front of me. I had later learned from Jason that he had called this group of Elk in. My tag was for either a Bull or Cow but I already made the decision to hold out for a Bull the first few days, then if I was unable to harvest a Bull I would settle for a Cow. Elk meat is my favorite and either sex would work for me on my dinner plate. The group of Elk I was watching walked in line one after the other that included three Cows, two Calves and a spike Bull. Another spike Bull walked within 5 yards of my stand and stood there for a few seconds, then proceeded to walk under my stand and stop within 20 yards of my stand before trotting away to join the other group of Cows and Calves. In Colorado the regulations say that a Bull must have 4-points on one side or a brow tine less than five inches in length in order to be legal. I didn’t have a clear shot at the Cows and besides I was hunting for a mature Bull at least for the first few days. However it was nice to see these wild critters and made sitting in the stand more enjoyable.

It was nearly noon when Jason and I got out of our treestands to meet up in a shaded area to eat lunch. Because the rut was in full swing and Elk could emerge at anytime from anywhere, we were careful to be on alert as we ate our lunch and talked softly in strategizing the afternoon and evening hunt. We decided that I should return to my treestand but we made a change in Jason’s location so that he would be much closer to my stand. We built a ground blind for Jason out of evergreen bough’s 20 yards behind my stand which made it easier to communicate with him and hopefully bring Elk in closer to my location. Every 15-20 minutes that afternoon Jason would go through a sequence of Cow calls. On one occasion two Cows meandered up on the ridge to the right of us 45 yards away. Later that afternoon two spike Bulls walked within 20 yards of my stand before stopping to graze. They had no idea of our presence which told us we were well concealed and our scent cover spray was working. The spike Bulls walked away slowly never knowing we where there. We decided to leave our stands an hour before dark so as to be able to hunt our way down the mountain. As we walked slowly down the mountain we heard a bugle 150 yards away. We closed the gap by 50 yards before setting up behind a tree. Jason Cow called and it wasn’t long before he spotted the Elk. A Cow, Calf and Bull were coming right toward us now only 40 yards away. I had to reposition myself for a better shot through openings in the trees but when I did the Elk saw my movement and bolted. Jason continued calling but the Elk were gone. Disappointment set in as we both thought about the real possibility of this being the only opportunity we would have to fill my tag for a Bull Elk. We both knew this is the game that we as bowhunters signed up for, but it still didn’t make us feel any better. The walk back to our ATV’s was without conversation as thoughts of missing this opportunity filled our heads. Only after returning to our camper and eating dinner did we discuss the day’s activities and the strategy for the next day’s hunt. As I laid in bed I reminded myself that we had a very productive and exciting day and that we had several more days to create new opportunities. The sting of this missed opportunity started to fade as I drifted off into a deep sleep.

The alarm rang loud again at 3:30am and this time I found myself needing more time getting out of bed. Sore and tired I finally settled into our early morning routine before leaving the comfort of our camper for the long bumpy ATV ride to our hunting area. As we pulled our ATV’s to a stop at the bottom of the mountain, I dreaded the climb up the mountain to where we had planned to hunt. I reminded my son Jason to take it slow going up the mountain so as to conserve energy and we would be less likely to spook Elk. Nearing the top of the mountain there is a beautiful aspen grove where Elk like to bed down. As we approached the grove we heard a bugle to our left only 100 yards away. Although it was light, the sun had not yet come up. I quickly positioned myself in front of a young pine tree to break up my silhouette, Jason retreated some 50 yards behind me to try and call the Bull in. Shortly Jason’s Cow calls began to ring out. I was confident that this set-up would produce a shooting opportunity so I concentrated on controlling my emotions and at the same time looking everywhere I could to try and pick up movement. Using my rangefinder I ranged several trees and rocks so as to have a good idea of how far the Bull was from me once he stepped out of the trees. After several minutes I started to wonder if the Bull would come out at all. Jason continued to work his Cow calls and as time passed there was still no sign of the Bull. Twenty minutes had passed since we first heard the Bull bugle. Unfortunately the Bull never did come out of the trees. Jason and I felt the Bull had other Cows with him and didn’t want to leave them. We both felt disappointment that I didn’t get a shooting opportunity but agreed that this was an exciting way to start the second day of our hunting trip.

We slowly worked our way to the top of the mountain. When we got to our hunting area Jason took his position in the ground blind we built the day before and I took refuge in my treestand some 17 feet above the forest floor. As the sun broke over the top of the mountains Jason began his sequence of Cow calls. It wasn’t long before I spotted a group of Cow Elk walking briskly through the trees 60 yards to my left. I was hoping to see a Bull with them but no such luck. As the group of Cows continued on their way out of sight I remember feeling good about the number of Elk sighting we’ve experienced up until now. In my mind it was just a matter of time before I would get a shooting opportunity.

There were no more Elk sighting that morning and as noon approached I got down from my treestand and joined Jason for lunch. We enjoyed our lunch in the shade of several Ponderosa Pines while strategizing for the afternoon and evening hunt. We had decided to change things up a bit by changing hunting locations. We had another treestand already set up in a location some 200 yards from where we’ve been hunting. This new location had fresh Elk signs including droppings and hoof prints. There was also rubs on many of the pine trees that dotted the top of this ridge. We decided to take Jason’s treestand down from its original location and set it up next to my treestand in this new location. This would give Jason the ability to call Elk from an elevated position without having to from the ground where his scent could be detected easier.

Bob and Jason Elk Photo 5

Bob & Jason Svetich
2015 Elk Hunt

It was 2:45 in the afternoon when we finally got Jason’s treestand secured in the tree next to mine. By 3:00pm we were in our stands waiting for the forest to quiet down. Once birds and squirrels began to sound off we knew it was ready to start calling. Jason began Cow calling and after a couple of hours of getting no response it was time to change things up. It was now around 5pm so Jason decided to pull out his bugle to see if we could get a Bull to respond. It didn’t take long before we heard a Bull bugle in the distance. We estimated the call came from a distance of a few hundred yards so Jason worked the Bull with Cow calls to try and bring him in. Then Jason spotted movement straight ahead of us. A spike Bull came in to Jason’s Cow calls and stopped right in front of us at no more than 20 yards away. He stood there looking for the Cow he just heard but after several minutes he wondered off when he couldn’t see any Cows. We both felt good about bringing in the young Bull but he wasn’t legal to shoot.

It was now 6:15pm when we again heard bugling from several hundred yards away. Jason decided to be more aggressive with his calling and used both the bugle and Cow calls to entice the Bull. The Bull sounded like he was coming closer so Jason kept up his aggressive Cow calling and it was working. The Bull was bugling as he answered the Cow calls coming from Jason. Back and forth the calling went until we heard a bugle not more than 100 yards away. We both looked at each other knowing this is why we Bowhunt for Elk during the rut. Jason stopped calling knowing the Bull would appear as it approached from below. I repositioned myself in my treestand and stood up to get ready for what promised to be a likely shooting opportunity. The Bull Elk trotted toward us some 60 yards away looking for the Cow he heard which was actually Jason’s call. I noticed he had a large set of antlers but I couldn’t make out how many points. As he walked toward our treestands I waited for the right moment to draw my bow. He walked behind some trees at which time I drew my bow and waited for him to walk into the open. He came to an opening standing only 16 yards away from our treestands. I saw that he was a 6×6 and immediately I began to look for the right shot placement. He was facing us straight on so the only shot I had was a frontal shot into his chest. I waited for him to turn for a broadside shot. He began to get nervous so I had to make the decision to shoot or wait for a better shot or possibly lose him. I decided to wait for a better shot which never came. He got suspicious when he couldn’t see any Cows and bolted. My son and I looked at each other and shook our heads in disbelief. As darkness started to set in, we both sat in our treestands thinking about what had just transpired and wondering if we would get another opportunity which is promised to no one in the sport of bowhunting.

The next morning I was still feeling the disappointment of last evenings hunt. I knew I would need to erase that memory out of my mind knowing we did everything we could to get a shot at the big Bull. Focusing on the task at hand and strategizing on this morning’s hunt was now paramount. We decided to hunt the same area where we called that big 6×6 in and hoped we would get another opportunity. Although we heard some faint bugles in the distant, the morning hunt was unproductive. Jason and I got down from our stands as the lunch hour approached to find a shaded area to eat and discuss our options. We decided to walk to an area 150 yards away where we had previously seen Elk. We found a shaded area just off a well worn game trail and settled into a stand of pines. Here we could quietly eat our lunch and still have an opportunity to detect Elk movement. After a hearty lunch Jason and I felt the effects of the early morning wakeup calls over the last several days so we decide to take a nap. As we laid on the forest floor cushioned by a build-up of pine needles, the cool air and soft breeze was all we needed for a relaxing nap. It wasn’t long before Jason’s snoring broke the silence of this high mountain paradise, at which time I knew he had succumbed to short nights and physical days Elk hunting at high altitudes. Although I was feeling relaxed and tired, I couldn’t seem to fall asleep. As I lay there using my backpack for a pillow and looking up at the cobalt blue sky, my thoughts were filled with gratitude for the opportunity to bowhunt these great animals with my son Jason. Bowhunting Elk during the rut is one of my true passions in life.

It was now 2:00pm in the afternoon. Jason was still sound asleep as I relaxed listening to the call of soaring Ravens high above. Then I heard it. A cow Elk chirp close enough to make me take notice. Shortly after came a bugle from the same area. I looked over at Jason to see if he might have heard the calls from these nearby Elk. He was in a deep sleep enjoying some well needed rest. I hesitated to wake him but felt these Elk were close enough to make an attempt to call them in. I reached over and shook Jason a few times and as he woke from his deep sleep it was apparent he was initially disoriented. A few seconds past when I said…”Jason, I heard a Cow chirp and bugle no more than 100 yards away, I think we need to try and call them in.” Jason immediately rose to his feet and walked 50-60 yards behind me with the hope he would be able to entice the Elk to me. I grabbed my bow and set up behind a small evergreen tree nearby. Jason began a sequence of Cow calls. After about ten minutes no Elk appeared. I shook my head in disbelief not understanding why we were unable to call these Elk to us.

Elk Photo 2

Bob Svetich
2015 Bow Elk Hunt

Then suddenly I saw movement. A Cow Elk appeared 40 yards away walking slowly from my left to my right. Then another Cow appeared followed by several other Cows. My Elk tag allowed me to harvest either a Cow or a Bull and my mind raced to determine whether or not to take a Cow as it would provide a year’s worth of my favorite meat. An empty freezer void of Elk meat back home said to harvest a Cow. My gut said wait for the Bull that most likely will be bringing up the rear behind the Cows. I had to make a quick decision so as not to miss my opportunity. As I watched the harem of Cows walk within bow range I heard the Bull’s bugle less than 60 yards away. It was loud and shrilling as the high pitched sound filled the silence of that crisp autumn afternoon. My attention was now on the Bull as I watched the Cow’s slowly working their way in front of me unaware of my presence only 30 yards away. Jason was able to see this all play out as he continued to work the group of Elk with his Cow calling. Then the Bull appeared. Noticeably larger in size than the Cows he confidently walked several yards behind the last Cow in his harem. He was 45 yards away from me as he followed his harem and let out another dominate bugle. I could tell he was a mature herd Bull and watched his every move. My challenge was to keep in front of him without the Cows seeing me. I let the last Cow walk well past me before I made a move to get ahead of the Bull in order to get into position for a possible shot. Looking for an opening through the dense cover I was concerned about getting a clear shot. As the Bull continued walking in the same direction now only 35 yards away I kept moving ahead of him looking for a small opening in the trees where I would be able to get a shot off. Finally I saw a break in the trees and knelt down hoping this would be my chance. As the Bull came within view of the opening Jason’s calling was bringing him right to me. No doubt the Bull wanted to round-up another Cow to add to his harem and made his way right toward me. As the Bull approached within 25 yards I drew my bow waiting for the perfect shot. He still did not detect me and at 20 yards he stopped broadside looking for the Cow he heard which in reality was Jason’s Cow calls. From a kneeling position and at full-draw I placed my twenty-yard pin on the Bulls vitals. A moderate size pine tree was blocking some of my shot so I slowly moved only my upper body to the right which cleared the tree for the shot. I released the arrow and followed through making sure my technique was the same as I practiced so many times leading up to this trip. The arrow found its mark right behind his front shoulder and as I looked for the arrow, the only part of it that was sticking out of the animal was the fletching. With nearly the entire arrow within the body of the animal including its perfect placement, I knew I had made an ethical shot. The Bull turned and trotted away quickly but stopped 20 yards away. Jason kept up his calling as he couldn’t see what was happening. The Bull then walked 15 more yards before dropping. I couldn’t believe what had just transpired as I looked up to the heavens and thanked God for the opportunity. Jason walked from his calling position to my location to learn if I had taken the shot as he was not able to see me from where he was calling from. He heard the animal breaking branches but didn’t know if I had taken the shot or not. I told him I took the shot and saw the animal drop to the ground 35 yards away. We hugged and pumped our fists in the air knowing we had beat the odds and experienced a hunting trip like no other we have ever had together. Although I was sure the Bull wasn’t going anywhere we agreed to wait a half-hour just to play it safe.

As we sat there quietly talking about how this particular hunting trip unfolded, we shook our heads only this time in amazement of the emotional roller coaster ride that every bowhunter experiences. It’s part of why we bowhunt and why there is no other hunting experience like calling in a mature Bull during the rut.


The Outdoor Group, Inc. Aligns with Field Sport Concepts, Ltd.

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LOVELAND, COLORADO (July 2015) – The Outdoor Group, Inc. recently announced aligning with Field Sport Concepts, Ltd. Over the past few years the two companies have been discussing a number of projects and business opportunities.

Trout Headwaters Inc

The Outdoor Group, Inc. Chairman/CEO Bob Svetich comments; “We are proud to be aligning with Field Sport Concepts, Ltd. Robert McKee and his professional staff are extremely knowledgeable and experienced in their field. I look forward to working with them on exciting land-use sporting life projects.”

Founded in 1993, Field Sport Concepts, Ltd. (www.fieldsport.com ) is an affiliation of nationally respected consultants in the disciplines of resource and land planning, civil engineering, landscape architecture, equine architecture, environmental sciences, conservation finance, and field sport facility/venue design.

Old Easement

Committed to sustainable ownership and rural land preservation, their organization offers a comprehensive resource aimed at presenting landowners with options for field sport programs along with economically feasible and sustainable strategies for short and long-term land-use, conservation and environmentally respectful development.

Wildlife Resources

The strength of FSC lies in being able to fully unlock the economic and recreational potential of a property by planning for multiple compatible uses such as appropriate sporting programs in combination with conservation communities and easements; habitat and waterway restoration; comprehensive wildlife, natural resource, and timber management; wetland banking; and agriculture.

Combining their range of expertise with their passion for the outdoors, Field Sport Concepts offers ways to enhance rural properties in a manner that is sympathetic to the natural environment while providing opportunities for the pursuit and appreciation of the sporting life and outdoor activities.

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Low impact development and sustainability are hallmarks of Field Sport Concepts’ philosophy and practice. In designing environments of enduring quality and beauty, it is their belief that there is a tried and true relationship between good planning and the creation of economic and social value.

Field Sport Concepts, Ltd. Founding Principal Robert McKee comments; “The mission of Field Sport Concepts remains the same as the day it was founded:

To assist those who own or control rural landholdings in preserving, enhancing, or planning alternative uses for the properties in their charge. We actively advocate the introduction of outdoor activities and recreational pursuits as a means of sustaining rural traditions while promoting a land stewardship ethic and creating economic value.“

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When asked about aligning with The Outdoor Group, Inc. Mr. McKee commented; “Field Sport Concepts is delighted to align with The Outdoor Group, a fine world class organization. Our association is a natural given our common interests and commitment to the environment and the conservation of rural lands and wildlife habitat as a means to sustain the perpetuation of the sporting life.

Bob Svetich and I have been talking for several years now about his successful enterprises that have given him the opportunity to work in the field that he loves, promoting and providing outstanding outdoor experiences for sportsmen and women. From the onset, he has generously connected FSC with talented and respected individuals and organizations in the recreation industry with whom he believed we may have some synergy. These introductions have proved to be valuable in expanding our ability to collaborate in the delivery of our expertise to landowners who are enthusiastic about the possibilities for the properties for which they are responsible.

We look forward to becoming part of its team as The Outdoor Group expands its services to those clientele who may be considering enhancing their own sporting properties through the implementation of quality, innovative land planning and design.”

Robert McKee is a licensed professional engineer and registered landscape architect. He is the President of McKee Carson, a land planning, landscape architecture and civil engineering firm based in Charlottesville, Virginia and is the Founding Principal of Field Sport Concepts, Ltd. with offices in Charlottesville and Austin, Texas. He can be reached by email at: rmckee@fieldsport.com


The Outdoor Group, Inc. Aligns with Covey Rise Magazine

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LOVELAND, COLORADO (June 15, 2015) – The Outdoor Group, Inc. recently announced their aligning with Covey Rise, a magazine devoted to our upland sporting lifestyle.

Chairman/CEO Bob Svetich of The Outdoor Group, Inc. comments: “We are proud to be aligning with Covey Rise magazine. John Thames and his staff do an excellent job in showcasing the best our upland sporting lifestyle has to offer. Great stories and photos capture our imagination and excites our souls. I always look forward with great anticipation to receive the next issue.”

Covey Rise is an award-winning upland lifestyle magazine. Covey Rise features a 100-lb cover, 80-lb paper, is perfect bound, and is written and illustrated by award-winning writers and photographers. Emerging writers and photographers are introduced regularly as well. The content-to-advertising ratio is 75 percent – 25 percent, and the clean and distinct layout and design resulted in three 2013 MIN Awards: Hottest Launch, Best Art Direction, and Best use of Illustration.

Covey Rise was founded in 2003 as an enthusiast newspaper with an objective of connecting conservation groups and quail hunters.

In 2012 John Thames bought exclusive publishing rights to the established brand name Covey Rise and elected to expand the title and re-launch the magazine. Thames’ move ran counter-current to contemporary publishing trends (the steady increase of digital production), and produced a lifestyle print publication devoted to all aspects of upland bird hunting. Covey Rise focuses on interesting personalities, conservationists, venues, fine shotguns and gear, culinary and spirits, travel, and dogs.

John Thames

John Thames is the CEO and Publisher of Covey Rise. Published out of Alabama by Covey Rise, LLC, Thames has owned and produced Covey Rise for just over three years.

“My goal with Covey Rise is to create a magazine that readers will enjoy many decades from now, and that means a 100-lb cover, 80-lb paper, perfect bound, with content generated from award-winning writers and photographers.”

“I grew up hunting for just about everything on my granddaddy’s farm. Granddaddy was featured in a Sports Afield article in the 1950’s, and every now and then I’ll pull out the issue and re-read it. To me, that is the power of print. I think about that concept now that my son David and my oldest daughter Laura are beginning to hunt. To publish a magazine that carries enough weight for them to pull out and read 60 years from now? It’s a goal that we all share at Covey Rise, particularly because our readers are similarly minded, too.”

The article was not the only component from his Grandfather that Thames has carried with him over the years. Thames grew up in rural South Alabama, where his grandfather’s family business operated. The family business, Stallworth Timber, played a major role in Thames’ molding and upbringing. Not only was he surrounded by 2,000 acres of land to hunt, his family business entertained clients on the property. Stallworth Timber hosted clients who did business with them from all over the country, to come hunt. Thames was exposed at an early age of what goes in to entertaining people.

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“My childhood and family taught me the value of people, and my interest in people started with being exposed to everyone who came to the Swamp, and their story. My parents pushed me at a young age to learn how to sell myself and what I believed in. These things became a part of me, that is what I want Covey Rise to exude – telling stories of this lifestyle and sharing this lifestyle that I enjoy so much.”

Thames resides in Alexander City, Alabama, with his wife, Margie, and three children David, Laura, and Libby. Also a part of the family are their two English springer spaniels and German short-haired pointer. His family enjoys all aspects of the outdoors, Margie enjoys shooting skeet and David has taken to fly-fishing. Thames is a founding board member and supporter of the local Quail Forever chapter. For more information about Covey Rise magazine visit their website at CoveyRiseMagazine.com. Photos by Terry Allen at TerryAllenPhotography.com.

The Outdoor Group, Inc. Aligns with NICHOLAS AIR, Inc.

Plane and Pilots

LOVELAND, COLORADO (June 10, 2015) – The Outdoor Group, Inc. recently announced their partnership agreement with NICHOLAS AIR, Inc., a premier private air travel company.

Sporting travelers are by definition a very unique group of passionate outdoorsmen and women. They travel to far reaches of the globe in search of sporting adventures that will fill their souls and stimulate their primal instincts, much like Earnest Hemingway experienced over eighty years ago. Although our inner calling for outdoor adventure remains much the same for us today as it was for Hemingway, the way we travel does not.

The Outdoor Group, Inc. Chairman/CEO Bob Svetich comments; “A lifetime of hard work and sacrifice has earned our discerning clients the right to enjoy a sporting lifestyle that demands only the finest things. Air travel is no exception. One of our divisions “Celebrity Sporting Concierge…The Art of Fine Adventures” services our celebrity clientele and affluent sporting traveler to the most elite sporting destinations around the globe. We are proudly partnered with only the most trusted names in the travel industry including our new partner, NICHOLAS AIR, Inc.”

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NICHOLAS AIR, Inc. is distinguishable in providing the most innovative, efficient, and customizable options for private air travel. They are the private aviation experts. As a premier private air travel company, they offer exceptional service at the most cost-effective rates with a five-year or newer fleet of aircraft. NICHOLAS AIR, Inc. offers three easily customizable programs to choose from in addition to a jet management program for the most frequent flyers. These programs can be fully customized to meet the client’s unique travel needs.

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NICHOLAS AIR, Inc has been serving the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and Caribbean since 1997. As a privately owned company, they have thrived and quickly grown into one of the most prestigious private air travel companies in the country. NICHOLAS AIR, Inc. provides exclusive programs and a means of travel for a wide range of clients. From families and business executives to professional athletes and celebrities, NICHOLAS AIR, Inc. is the choice for passengers who need extra security and privacy.

When you fly with NICHOLAS AIR, Inc. you work directly with them, the operator. As the owner and maintainer of all aircraft in the fleet, they pay meticulous attention to the details of safety, service, and quality. Operating accident-free, the company was founded on the principles of expertise, safety, precision and superior service. They maintain a five-year or newer fleet of aircraft and go above and beyond to ensure the client’s experience is the best private air travel has to offer.

When asked what their secret to success is, Nicholas Correnti President of NICHOLAS AIR, Inc. comments; “It’s all about building relationships. People like to do business with real people who genuinely care about their clients. Every flight is on a NICHOLAS AIR aircraft as our fleet is privately owned and operated. Our members enjoy access to our exclusive fleet and a direct working relationship with our schedulers and flight crews. The passion and experience of our employees is why we have been able to exceed our client’s expectations for nearly 20 years.”

Mr. Correnti also comments: “NICHOLAS AIR is excited to begin this unique partnership with The Outdoor Group, Inc. Our clients enjoy an exceptional experience each time they fly with us, and we look forward to forming new and lasting relationships with the hunters and sportsmen who depend on The Outdoor Group for their sporting adventures.”

To learn more about NICHOLAS AIR, Inc. visit their website at NicholasAir.com. For your luxury sporting travel adventures to world-class destinations around the globe contact The Outdoor Group, Inc.

Celebrity Legends Big Hit at Bimini Big Game Club
The Outdoor Group, Inc. Reunites Hall of Famers

John Havlicek, Bob Knight, and Stu Apte  Photo by Billy Black

John Havlicek, Bob Knight, and Stu Apte – Photo by Billy Black

LOVELAND, COLORADO (March 30, 2015) – Their numbers are staggering. Whether it was setting records in college and professional basketball or in the world of fishing, these three men are in a league of their own. They are respectively; Hall of Fame and former NBA Boston Celtics player John Havlicek, Hall of Fame College Basketball Coach Bob Knight, and Hall of Fame fisherman and World Records holder Stu Apte.

Chairman/CEO Bob Svetich comments; “As I sat outside on the deck of the Bimini Bar and Grill with these three legends talking about basketball and fishing, I couldn’t help but think how blessed I was to have the opportunity to spend the next five days with these Hall of Famers in the Bahamas at the legendary Big Game Fishing Capital of the World, Bimini Big Game Club. I had a wonderful time and will never forget this once in a lifetime experience.”

Bob Svetich, Bob Knight, Stu Apte, John Havlicek and Kevin Koenig

Bob Svetich, Bob Knight, Stu Apte, John Havlicek and Kevin Koenig

In addition to the celebrity guests, this star studded group also included public relations professional John Bell covering the event on behalf of the Big Game Club, editor and writer for the Anglers Journal Magazine Kevin Koenig, professional photographer Billy Black, and Chairman/CEO of The Outdoor Group, Inc. Bob Svetich. Round-trip air travel from Fort Lauderdale to Bimini was provided by Tropic Ocean Airways, Inc. FlyTropic.com.

After a short flight from Fort Lauderdale the seaplane landed at Bimini where the group was taken by golf carts, the preferred way of travel on the Island, to the legendary Big Game Club where they were greeted by Dafna Ronis the clubs General Manager and her staff.

The celebrities were here to match wits with the elusive bonefish, also referred to as the Grey Ghost. The weather conditions were perfect throughout the trip and although several fish were caught, fishing was slow overall. However, the slower than normal fishing didn’t dampen the spirit of the group as story after story was told by the celebrities reminiscing about championship seasons and world-record fish caught.

Photo by Billy Black

Photo by Billy Black

All to soon the day arrived when it was time to leave the gin-clear waters of this laidback tropical island and head back to the fast-paced life that was left behind a few days earlier. As the group dispersed from the Fort Lauderdale terminal going their separate ways, one couldn’t help but think about the passionate stories that were told much like Earnest Hemingway did 80 years ago when he first came to this legendary place.

For more information about Bimini Big Game Club visit their website at BigGameClubBimini.com. Their management company is Horizon Hotel Group, HorizonHotelGroup.com. Custom fly boxes provided by Vermont Fly Box Company at VermontFlyBoxCompamy.com. For information about securing celebrity talent as Keynote Speakers or sporting event participants, contact The Outdoor Group, Inc.

Bob Knight – Celebrity Wingshooting Trip


Bob Knight on court

The Outdoor Group, Inc. cordially invites you to join us and our celebrity guest for 3 nights/2 days of world-class wingshooting.

Join legendary Hall of Fame Basketball Coach, Bob Knight, for a wingshooting experience you will never forget!

This is your once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close and personal with one of the winningest college basketball coaches of all time.

Share hunting and sports stories with this great sports legend.

Click here for details: Celebrity Wingshooting Trip

Celebrity Legends Big Hit at Bimini Big Game Club
The Outdoor Group, Inc. Reunites Hall of Famers

John Havlicek, Bob Knight, and Stu Apte  Photo by Billy Black

John Havlicek, Bob Knight, and Stu Apte – Photo by Billy Black

LOVELAND, COLORADO (March 30, 2015) – Their numbers are staggering. Whether it was setting records in college and professional basketball or in the world of fishing, these three men are in a league of their own. They are respectively; Hall of Fame and former NBA Boston Celtics player John Havlicek, Hall of Fame College Basketball Coach Bob Knight, and Hall of Fame fisherman and World Records holder Stu Apte.

Chairman/CEO Bob Svetich comments; “As I sat outside on the deck of the Bimini Bar and Grill with these three legends talking about basketball and fishing, I couldn’t help but think how blessed I was to have the opportunity to spend the next five days with these Hall of Famers in the Bahamas at the legendary Big Game Fishing Capital of the World, Bimini Big Game Club. I had a wonderful time and will never forget this once in a lifetime experience.”

Bob Svetich, Bob Knight, Stu Apte, John Havlicek and Kevin Koenig

Bob Svetich, Bob Knight, Stu Apte, John Havlicek and Kevin Koenig

In addition to the celebrity guests, this star studded group also included public relations professional John Bell covering the event on behalf of the Big Game Club, editor and writer for the Anglers Journal Magazine Kevin Koenig, professional photographer Billy Black, and Chairman/CEO of The Outdoor Group, Inc. Bob Svetich. Round-trip air travel from Fort Lauderdale to Bimini was provided by Tropic Ocean Airways, Inc. FlyTropic.com.

After a short flight from Fort Lauderdale the seaplane landed at Bimini where the group was taken by golf carts, the preferred way of travel on the Island, to the legendary Big Game Club where they were greeted by Dafna Ronis the clubs General Manager and her staff.

The celebrities were here to match wits with the elusive bonefish, also referred to as the Grey Ghost. The weather conditions were perfect throughout the trip and although several fish were caught, fishing was slow overall. However, the slower than normal fishing didn’t dampen the spirit of the group as story after story was told by the celebrities reminiscing about championship seasons and world-record fish caught.

Photo by Billy Black

Photo by Billy Black

All to soon the day arrived when it was time to leave the gin-clear waters of this laidback tropical island and head back to the fast-paced life that was left behind a few days earlier. As the group dispersed from the Fort Lauderdale terminal going their separate ways, one couldn’t help but think about the passionate stories that were told much like Earnest Hemingway did 80 years ago when he first came to this legendary place.

For more information about Bimini Big Game Club visit their website at BigGameClubBimini.com. Their management company is Horizon Hotel Group, HorizonHotelGroup.com. Custom fly boxes provided by Vermont Fly Box Company at VermontFlyBoxCompamy.com. For information about securing celebrity talent as Keynote Speakers or sporting event participants, contact The Outdoor Group, Inc.


Fly Fishing’s Triple Threat Visits
“Celebrity Playground” Bimini Big Game Club
The Outdoor Group, Inc. Reunites
Former National College Basketball Champions

Havlicek-Knight-Apte

LOVELAND, COLORADO (February 17, 2015) – The New England Patriots may be the world champions of professional football, but when it comes to fly fishing this trio is in a world of their own. Hall of Fame NBA basketball player John Havlicek, legendary college basketball coach Bob Knight, and Hall of Fame fisherman Stu Apte. These legends will be ascending on Bimini Big Game Club just as novelist Ernest Hemmingway did along with other notable celebrities back in the 1930’s.

The Outdoor Group Inc. Chairman/CEO Bob Svetich comments; “I’m blessed and honored in bringing Havlicek and Knight together for some friendly competition fly fishing at this legendary venue, Bimini Big Game Club. Sports enthusiasts may remember that Havlicek and Knight played on the same 1959-60 Ohio State men’s basketball team that won the national championship that year. I owe a big thank you to my good friend John Bell (Writer/Public Relations Professional) in bringing Stu Apte to join us. Reuniting long time friends in the Bahamas will certainly be a memorable experience for us all.”

BIMINI BIG GAME CLUB

From the Lucayan Indian word meaning “two islands”, and known around the world simply as “Bimini”, North and South Bimini, along with their smaller neighboring cays, make up this group of Bahamian islands situated on the edge of the Great Bahama Bank, overlooking the cobalt blue waters of the storied Gulfstream and Florida Straits.

historical image bimini

While prosperity came and went quickly during the 1920’s and the era of Prohibition, the enduring appeal of Bimini was first popularized in the 1930’s by the exploits of noted sportsmen, industrialists and philanthropists who ventured to Bimini for world-class fishing. Legendary angler Zane Grey and his captain, Tommy Gifford, recluse Howard Hughes, and retailing genius turned scientist/naturalist Michael Lerner all collaborated in turning Bimini into the “Big Game Fishing Capital of the World.” It was this celebrity, and friendship with Lerner, that brought novelist Ernest Hemmingway to Bimini in 1935 – where he drank, brawled, and wrote his way through several fishing seasons, travelling back and forth between home in Key West and his beloved “Island in the Stream”. Tournaments attracting anglers from the far corners of the world became common as Bimini’s reputation for giant blue marlin and bluefin tuna blossomed.
Today, the schools of giant fish have moved on, with record catches the exception, not the rule. The island tempo has returned to a more leisurely pace. With its convenience to the mainland, Bimini remains a popular destination for boaters. Recreational fishermen have mostly replaced the professionals, and have expanded their interests beyond the pursuit of giant marlin.

bimini dive

The gin-clear waters surrounding Bimini have given rise to popular year-round recreational diving. Uniquely situated on the edge of the Continental Shelf, Bimini offers some of the most interesting dive sites in the Bahamas, and is consistently ranked one of the world’s top dive destinations. From a leisurely dolphin encounter to an adrenaline filled shark encounter, from a wall dive to a snorkel along the mysterious “Atlantis Road” – an ancient, underwater arrangement of stones that has baffled natives, mystics and scientists for generations – Bimini offers something for the diver of every skill level. Bimini continues to retain its allure for the water sports enthusiasts.

With unique seagrass habitat and endless miles of shallow flats, Bimini is a particularly popular bonefishing destination. The flats comprising Bimini Bay off North Bimini Island are now part of the Bahamas “Marine Protected Area”, ensuring a healthy bonefish habitat for generations to come. The “Big Bones” of Bimini are not just stories. You’ll find them in the IGFA record books!

bone fish bimini

The Legend is Born. Nassau entrepreneur and bon-vivant, Neville Stuart, opened the “Bimini Big Game Fishing Club” in 1936 and began organizing big game fishing tournaments, attracting sportsmen from around the world. Originally a formal dining club, with tuxedo and tie as the preferred attire for gentlemen, the club moved to its current location in 1954 with the completion of a marina and six cottages for visitors. Ever the promoter, Stuart published the Bimini Bugle, offering a weekly chronicle of life on Bimini, and in his spare time, built the town’s first power plant that truly lit up the streets. In 1963 the main hotel building opened, firmly establishing Alice Town as a mecca for big-game fishing. Alice Town is a colorful out-island port of call, complete with character — and it’s the characters that give it a special personality. On an after-hours stroll down Kings Highway, new and returning visitors are as likely to run into Jimmy Buffett as their neighbor from down the street back home. For each, Bimini is their “Island in the Stream”.

bimini-pool

The Club was later acquired by the Bacardi family, and underwent two years of renovation that included the new marina, complete guestroom renovation, new fuel facilities and a host of other improvements. The Bacardi’s reopened the legendary resort in the Spring of 1972 and positioned it as one of the world’s foremost big game angling resorts until its sale in 2000.

Today, after several brief ownership changes the Big Game Club carries a familiar vision to make the Club legendary for Out-Island hospitality and sportsmanship. Your hosts at the Big Game Club are honored to be the custodians of the club’s legacy, ensuring its continued reputation as a world acclaimed destination for discriminating sportsmen and their families. To learn more about this legendary venue visit their website at www.biggameclubbimini.com. Management Company is Horizon Hotel Group www.horizonhotelgroup.com

1959-60 OHIO STATE MEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS

Ohio_State_1959-60-team-photo

The 1959-60 Ohio State men’s basketball team is the only basketball team to win a national title in Ohio State history. They were coached by Hall of Fame coach Fred Taylor and had three future Hall of Famers on their roster—center Jerry Lucas (#11), forward John Havlicek (#5) and reserve forward Bob Knight (#24), who entered the Hall for his storied coaching career, most notably at Indiana.

The Buckeyes steamrolled through the NCAA tournament by an average of 19.5 points a game, dusting off California 75-55 in the final behind two future NBA stars, Jerry Lucas and John Havlicek. The Buckeyes hit 84 percent of their shots and coasted to a 75-55 victory. The underclassmen also made it to the championship game the next two seasons, but lost each time to in-state rival Cincinnati.

JOHN HAVLICEK

Havlicek_Permit

Havlicek competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA championships, four of them coming in his first four seasons. In the NBA, only teammates Bill Russell and Sam Jones won more championships during their playing careers. Havlicek is widely considered to be one of the greatest players in the history of the game. He was a three-sport athlete at Bridgeport High School in Bridgeport, Ohio and one of his boyhood friends was Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Phil Niekro. Havlicek averaged 14.6 points over his Ohio State career, and helped the ”Super Sophs” compile a 78-6 record. Many might be surprised that Havlicek was the Buckeyes’ second-leading rebounder. A great all-around athlete, he thought about playing for the Cleveland Browns, who took him in the seventh round of the NFL draft, before joining the Boston Celtics, who had selected in the first round in 1962. He scored more than 26,000 points in 16 seasons and was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1983.

He was selected one of the top 50 players of the NBA in 1997.

BOB KNIGHT

Knight_Fishing_Photo

Better known as a coach than a player, Knight averaged 3.7 points as a sub on the national championship team. He would go on to win (902) games, the most at the time of his retirement, and currently ranks third all time. He spent six years (1965-71) at Army, going 102-50, and 29 years (1971-2000) at Indiana, where he went 661-240, won 11 Big Ten titles and NCAA championships in 1976, 1981 and 1987. He received National Coach of the Year honors four times and Big Ten Coach of the Year honors eight times. In 1984, he coached the USA men’s Olympic team to a gold medal, becoming one of only three basketball coaches to win an NCAA title, NIT title, and an Olympic gold medal. Knight was one of college basketball’s most successful and innovative coaches, having perfected and popularized the motion offense. He has also been praised for running clean programs (none of his teams were ever sanctioned by the NCAA for recruiting violations) and graduating most of his players. He closed out his successful yet turbulent coaching career with seven years (2001-08) at Texas Tech, going 138-82.

He is now an analyst on ESPN, and was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1991.

STU APTE

Stu was a fighter pilot in the Navy during the Korean conflict. He then spent the next 34 years flying for Pan Am, while pursuing his ” Reel Passion of Fishing.” He began fly fishing in the mid-1940s and began guiding anglers in the mid-1950s, in the Florida Keys, while laid off from Pan Am. Through the years, Stu has held more than 44 saltwater light tackle and fly rod World Records, including the two longest standing saltwater fly rod records. A 58 pound dolphin caught in 1964 and a 136 pound Pacific Sailfish caught in 1965, both on 12 pound tippet.

Stu_Apte_photo

The Stu Apte Tarpon Fly and Stu Apte Improved Blood Knot are standard items. The Stu Apte fly has also had the distinction of being featured on a United States postage stamp in 1991. In 1969 Stu was inducted into the Fishing Hall of Fame.

In 2003 Stu was the recipient of the prestigious Ted Williams Award and in 2004 for the fifth-year in a row, was the Pro Celebrity Grand Champion of the Backbone Tournament. Stu had the distinction of joining Ted Williams, Curt Gowdy, Ernest Hemingway, Izaak Walton and Zane Grey to name just a few, when he was inducted into the International Game fish Association [IGFA] Hall of Fame December 11th, 2005. Stu was inducted into the Fly Fishing Hall of Fame 2012.

As a natural extension of this passion for fly fishing he has written many feature articles for Outdoor Life, Field & Stream, and Sports Afield to name a few, as well as being the Angling Editor of Sea & Rudder, a national boating magazine. He was Contributing Editor to Fly Fishing in Salt Waters magazine doing the back page byline, “Down and Dirty” with Stu Apte. He was also Field Editor for Shallow Water Angler, doing the back page column, “Stu Apte on Fishing.”

In addition to writing, Stu appeared in ABC’s Wide World of Sports, was field host on ABC’s American Sportsman TV Shows , CBS Sports Spectacular, Thrill-Maker Sports, ESPN’s On The Fly, Walker Cay Chronicles , Sportsman’s Adventures and the Teddy Award winning Sportsman’s Journal with Andy Mill ” THE LEGEND OF STU APTE”, and ESPN’s Out There, co-hosting The Outdoor World TV series on OLN. Most recently has done guest appearances on seven of Ray Van Horn’s Gypsy angler TV show.

He directed and stared in a Paramount Studios Short Subject “Keys to Fishing Fun”, that premiered in Radio City Music Hall in 1969. He also produced the award-winning “Tarpon Country” film in for Evinrude motors in 1976, starred in and directed the award-winning video series “Saltwater Fly Fishing From A to Z.” One of his latest videos is “Quest For Giant Tarpon”, which won a Teddy award for best fishing video 1993/94. He received a 2000 “Telly Award” for a striped bass TV show shot in New England.

Stu has served as an officer and trustee of the Everglades Protection Association; is on the executive board of The Bonefish and Tarpon Trust (BTT) conservation organization and is on the advisory board of the International Game Fish Association [I.G.F.A.]. Stu is on the advisory Pro staff for Hells Bay Boats, and a member of Fishpond’s Ambassador Program. He also had three books published, the first was “Stu Apte’s Fishing in the Florida Keys” in 1976, the second book was his memoir, “Of Wind and Tides” in 2008 and his most recent book just out is MY LIFE in FISHING; Favorite Long Stories Told Short”.

These books and DVDs can be purchased from Stu’s website; Stuapte.com .


The Outdoor Group, Inc. Attends Dallas Safari Club Convention

DSC Convention Logo 2015

LOVELAND, COLORADO (January 26, 2015) The 2015 Dallas Safari Club Convention was held at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center, Dallas, Texas, January 15-18.
The Outdoor Group Inc. was repre-sented at this year’s convention by Mr. Steve Caballero, Executive Vice President of their Luxury Sporting Travel Division.

In late 2014 The Outdoor Group Inc. unveiled their “Signature Sporting Collection”. The Collection consists of only the finest luxury sporting destina-tions invited to partner with The Outdoor Group Inc. These luxury venues span the globe offering the distinguished sportsman a luxurious choice for their next sporting adventure. For more information on their “Signature Sporting Collection” lodges and resorts or to book your next sporting adventure contact Mr. Steve Caballero at 281-455-3341, or scaballero@theoutdoorgroupinc.com.

Pine_Hill_Plantation_Photo

Steve Caballero, Jackie & Doug Coe

Mr. Caballero was excited to attend this year’s DSC Convention and meet with the select venues that are partnered with The Outdoor Group Inc. in their “Signature Sport-ing Collection”.

Mr. Caballero comments; “It was a wonderful opportunity to visit with our venues and discuss plans on making 2015 a successful year for all. It’s always exciting to meet new partners and discuss how we can help make their venue more successful. I was also excited about having the opportunity to meet with old friends in the industry and spin a few fireside tales.”

The Dallas Safari Club annual convention is billed as “The Greatest Hunters Convention on the Planet”. The conventions consistent ability to sell out one million square feet of exhibitor space, increase numbers of atten-dees each year, and raise millions every year for conservation and education, certainly helps it live up to its billing.

Morani_River_Ranch_Photo

John & Diana Fredericks, Steve Caballero

One of the highlights of this year’s convention was the presen-tation of its prestigious “Peter Hathaway Capstick Hunting and Heritage Award” that was awarded to Dr. James Henry “Red” Duke of Houston, Texas. Dr. Duke a physician from Houston is known as the Father of Modern Trauma Surgery. Dr. Duke started the Houston Hermann Hospital Life Flight operations in 1976, and developed many trauma techniques and equipment that is still used today.

Dr. Duke is still active in the field today at the young age of 80. Dr. Duke has been a dedicated hunter and conservationist and has successfully taken the North American Grand Slam of Sheep. He has three species of sheep in the Boone & Crockett record book.

Mabula_Pro_Safaris

Stella Gomes, Steve Caballero,
Christo Gomes

Another highlight of this year’s convention was the raising of one million dollars in one minute. Yes, that’s correct, one million dollars was raised in one minute to support the Texas born Outdoor Adventures Program. After a spirited request from the podium for contributions, ten people stood up pledging $100,000 apiece. American spirit…you have to love it!

Make plans now to be a part of The Greatest Hunters Convention on the Planet in 2016. To receive more information on the 2016 convention or to become a member of Dallas Safari Club contact them at 972-980-9800 or info@biggame.org.


The Outdoor Group, Inc. Unveils it’s World-Class
“Signature Sporting Collection”

Highland Hills Ranch

LOVELAND, COLORADO (January 14, 2015) – The Outdoor Group, Inc. recently announced the unveiling of their new “Signature Sporting Collection”.

This boutique group of luxury sporting venues is the best-of-the-best. Elite sporting services are being offered under their Luxury Sporting Travel division for discerning sportsmen and women seeking World-Class hunting and fishing adventures including other five-star sporting services and amenities.

TOG Sporting Lodges Collection

We sat down with The Outdoor Group, Inc. Chairman/CEO Bob Svetich and this is what we learned. This unique collection of award winning hunting and fishing venues has been strategically selected by Mr. Svetich and his executive staff. Svetich said unlike other sporting travel agencies he will keep their “Signature Sporting Collection” boutique in size but elite in scope, and his focus is on the quality of offerings in their collection not the quantity. He went on to say their current Collection is their initial offering and that the number of venues is likely to increase based on demand. We also learned that it is advisable for anyone thinking about booking a hunting or fishing trip within their Collection to do so well in advance, as many of these World-Class venues are booked a year out or more.

Svetich also said that their Luxury Sporting Travel services are provided at no cost to their clients. Another amenity includes all aspects of booking their travel to include providing the client with their own personal travel concierge.

Mr. Svetich comments; “As a former managing partner of a high-end sporting venue I’ve learned that a World-Class venue must be more than a place where passionate hunters and fishers can fill their tags. This is a people business and beyond the luxury amenities and five-star service, a World-Class venue must go beyond what people expect and they must do it consistently.

TOG-Collage

When we consider a venue for our collection it is with a critical eye looking at every aspect of the operation including how they resolve client concerns. Unfortunately mistakes do happen but it’s how you resolve these concerns with the client that makes all the difference.”

You can view the company’s “Signature Sporting Collection” initial offering at theoutdoorgroupinc.com/lodges/.

Discerning sporting enthusiasts that want to book a World-Class hunting or fishing trip should contact Mr. Steve Caballaro at 281.455.3341 or by email at SCaballaro@TheOutdoorGroupInc.com.

World-Class sporting venues interested in being considered for inclusion into the company’s “Signature Sporting Collection” should contact Mr. Svetich directly at 970.593.2938.